Tag Archives: Social media

Get Your Business in the News

We’re hosting a free 45-minute informational webinar to help you earn media coverage.

If you’re working in public relations or running a business or nonprofit, our workshop is perfect for you.

The webinar is on December 16, 2013 at 11:30 AM EST.

You can register here.

We hope to see you on Dec. 16!

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Filed under Branding, Investor Relations, Marketing, Media Relations, Press Release, Public Relations, Publicity, Social Media

3 tips to integrate social media and news media

socialmedia
Today, most organizations have a social media presence. Social media allows you to cultivate a group of fans or followers who are truly interested in your organization.

But if you want to extend your reach to a broader audience or even others in your industry, coverage of your organization in traditional news media can help you do exactly that.

Here are three tips to help you use social media to gain more coverage in the news media:

1. Make the right connections… and listen! Many reporters and editors are now using social media. Find journalists in news media outlets that cover your region and industry. Follow their tweets and blog posts, and know what they are writing about. Use social media to learn their interests and the types of stories they cover.

2. Become a valuable resource. Point out to a reporter if something that’s relevant to your industry or region is generating a great deal of activity on social media. The journalist may want to check it out as a potential story. But make sure the activity affects the journalist’s audience in some way.

3. Fill the news hole. Today, there are many opportunities to earn news media coverage of your organization – if you know how. Just as cable news ushered in the 24-hour news cycle in the 1990s, social media has ramped up the quantity and pace of news coverage. That means journalists need information and story ideas for their tweets and blogs. On Twitter, follow hashtags on trending topics in your industry, then take the conversation with a journalist offline by sending an email with your take on events. Point reporters to your blog (if you have one) or Facebook fan page, and be a good source of information not just on your business, but on your industry.

Coverage in the news media can expose your organization – and your message – to others who might want to follow you, purchase your product, or become involved in your effort.

And, of course, we all know that to be effective you need to reach your audience as many times as possible, using as many communication channels as possible.

What are your thoughts??

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Filed under DIY PR, Marketing, Media Relations, Press Release, Public Relations, Publicity, Social Media

3 questions to consider before taking that new PR job

Are you an entry-level or early stage communications professional looking to start your career or move to another job?

We’ve gathered our wisdom on a few items you should consider before jumping at that job opportunity. All of these items can affect your day-to-day activities — and your job satisfaction.

1. How does senior management view communication? It helps to know as much as possible about how the top brass views the role of communications. Do they see public relations as playing a strategic role in the organization’s growth and success, or do they see communications as a supporting role in the company’s larger sales or marketing efforts? Similarly, find out as much as you can about how management views media relations and social media. Are they willing to meet the press and put themselves (or the organization) out there on social media? Do they see value in these tools?

2. What is the organizational culture? This is basically the day-to-day environment in which you will work. Does the organization spend a lot of time planning things in advance, or does it act more spontaneously in response to events of the day? There is always an element of spontaneity in public relations — sometimes, you have to react or respond quickly to events. You have to be nimble and seize the right opportunities to obtain media coverage or get your message out to your audience. However, spending all of your time reacting and little time planning can eventually result in burn out — and loss of quality control.

3. What is the communications mix? Does the workload fit well within your skill set, yet still provide growth opportunities? Ideally, you should be familiar with the main communication tools the organization uses to reach its various constituencies. For example, if video production is a key component of the organization’s communications mix, you should be familiar with how to write a solid script and visualize a story. However, you should have opportunities to learn new skills. Along these lines, consider whether you will have a mentor who can help you learn the industry and navigate you through the organization, or if you will be left to your own devices to learn the ropes.

There isn’t any right or wrong answer to any of these questions. How you answer depends on your work style, how you learn on the job, and what makes for a satisfying work experience. Good luck!

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Filed under Entry Level PR, Media Relations, Public Relations, Publicity