Tag Archives: Media

How media savvy are you?

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Pencils up! Find out how media savvy you are with the short, fun quiz below:

1. In order to earn media coverage for your organization, you should:
(a) Start your own TV station
(b) Conduct a publicity stunt
(c) Offer real news

2. The best way to earn credibility with the media is to:
(a) Return calls promptly
(b) Provide accurate information
(c) Deliver great sound bites
(d) All of the above
(e) None of the above

3. Which of the following can help you evaluate whether your story idea is newsworthy:
(a) If your boss gives you the thumbs up to issue a news release
(b) If a reporter hangs up on you during your story pitch
(c) A Newsworthiness Score from My News Wizard
(d) Both (b) and (c)

Answers: 1 (c); 2 (d); 3 (d)For more information. go to our website and check out our new, patent-pending technology that gives you a “Newsworthiness Score” for your story idea, plus recommendations to improve your Score.

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Filed under Marketing, Media Relations, My News Wizard Proprietary Technology, Press Release, Public Relations, Publicity, Technology

How to make news for your business…

Television Studio

We have some special advice for our Facebook fans who would like to obtain some favorable coverage of their business in their local news media.

Now that we are in November, several major holidays occur over the next two months. This marks a great time to tie your business – or your product – to the season. Need examples? Here are three:

  • Running a travel business? Call (or email) the features editor at your local newspaper and pitch a story about popular travel destinations for the holidays. Better yet, why not go for something unique and point out a place that’s off-the-beaten-path: the perfect place to go for the couple that wants to get away from it all during the holidays.
  • Selling jewelry? Do you have a unique piece of jewelry that has a story behind it? If so, call or email a business reporter at your local television news and explain why a particular piece of jewelry makes a unique holiday gift. What makes a piece of jewelry unique? Ask yourself these questions: Is there a history to the jewelry that would resonate with people in your region? Are the raw materials environmentally friendly? If none of these apply, is there a particular type of jewelry that is extremely popular right now? Can you explain why? If so, you may have the makings of a good story.
  • Are you a fitness expert, counselor or life coach? New Year’s is just around the corner. Call the health reporter at your local news station or the lifestyles or features editor at your hometown newspaper and pitch a story on New Year’s resolutions. Why do most people not keep them? What can someone do to increase the chances that they will stick to their resolution? What types of things should people be doing to start anew (from a work, family, diet, exercise or social perspective) at the start of a new year?
  • Keep in mind that your story pitch can’t come across as blatantly self-promotional, or else the media won’t be interested. How do you avoid that? Just be other-centered when you pitch the story. That means think about how the story you’d like to see in print, online or on TV affects others in your region. Make sure you explain that connection to a reporter.

    Make this the season to get your business some media coverage and hopefully some new customers. Even if you don’t get coverage, just by sending that email or making a phone call, you’ve put yourself on the radar screen of your local media. Sometime over the next few weeks is a great time to make that connection!

    Find us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/My-News-Wizard/217711711701595.

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    Filed under Branding, DIY PR, Marketing, Media Relations, News Angles, Press Release, Public Relations, Publicity

    3 tips to integrate social media and news media

    socialmedia
    Today, most organizations have a social media presence. Social media allows you to cultivate a group of fans or followers who are truly interested in your organization.

    But if you want to extend your reach to a broader audience or even others in your industry, coverage of your organization in traditional news media can help you do exactly that.

    Here are three tips to help you use social media to gain more coverage in the news media:

    1. Make the right connections… and listen! Many reporters and editors are now using social media. Find journalists in news media outlets that cover your region and industry. Follow their tweets and blog posts, and know what they are writing about. Use social media to learn their interests and the types of stories they cover.

    2. Become a valuable resource. Point out to a reporter if something that’s relevant to your industry or region is generating a great deal of activity on social media. The journalist may want to check it out as a potential story. But make sure the activity affects the journalist’s audience in some way.

    3. Fill the news hole. Today, there are many opportunities to earn news media coverage of your organization – if you know how. Just as cable news ushered in the 24-hour news cycle in the 1990s, social media has ramped up the quantity and pace of news coverage. That means journalists need information and story ideas for their tweets and blogs. On Twitter, follow hashtags on trending topics in your industry, then take the conversation with a journalist offline by sending an email with your take on events. Point reporters to your blog (if you have one) or Facebook fan page, and be a good source of information not just on your business, but on your industry.

    Coverage in the news media can expose your organization – and your message – to others who might want to follow you, purchase your product, or become involved in your effort.

    And, of course, we all know that to be effective you need to reach your audience as many times as possible, using as many communication channels as possible.

    What are your thoughts??

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    Filed under DIY PR, Marketing, Media Relations, Press Release, Public Relations, Publicity, Social Media

    The Art of the Sound Bite

    press conference

    Being quotable can earn you a top spot on a journalist’s list of go-to sources.

    So, what makes a good sound bite?

    Ideally, it should be something your audience can remember. That’s why making a good comparison or conjuring up a strong visual image can make for a compelling sound bite.

    But you also want to make your point. A good sound bite should deliver your message in a powerful and easy-to-understand way.

    A quick caveat: If you make a comparison, make sure it is a valid and appropriate one. It must apply to the situation — not be too dramatic or overstated, and certainly not something inappropriate to the situation.

    The next time you prepare for that big media interview, here are some tips for mastering the art of the sound bite:

    Keep your responses short. Television news packages can run on average from about 30 seconds to 2 minutes. Within that time, the reporter needs to explain the story and provide reaction. That means your air time may only be 10 seconds or less. Even in print and online, your comments are likely to be given no more than one or two sentences in a story.

    Practice before the interview. Always go into an interview with three key messages that you want to deliver. Write down your messages and then refine what you want to say. Ask a colleague to conduct a mock interview with you so you can practice delivering the responses and thinking on your feet when the reporter asks follow-up questions.

    Don’t talk too fast. Talk slowly enough so that the reporter can get everything down. Longer, complex sentences can be hard for busy print reporters to write down, especially if you continue talking after you’ve expressed the thought. A television audience can miss your point as well if you talk to fast and do not speak clearly.

    The media will return to you for comment if you can provide pithy, succinct quotes that capture the essence of something, and you will be representing your organization well if you are delivering a key message at the same time.

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    Filed under Crisis Communications, Media Relations, Public Relations